Advice, Stories and Learning 

Begin Your Transformation Today

An ongoing series of information and blogs


Why we use the Compex

January 15, 2018

The Compex is a form or Electrical Muscle Stimulation (EMS) that we utilize to help in a range of settings such as post operative, acute, and long-term injuries. EMS is used to aid in muscular development to facilitate strength or endurance. One of the benefits are that we can work a muscle without loading a joint thus increasing the muscle work and load causing strength, endurance and contraction improvements in a safe manner. EMS works by sending signals to a motor neuron through pads placed on a muscle that helps the muscle contract. This is just like how the brain sends a muscle a signal to contract and the muscle doesn't know the difference between a signal from the brain or the EMS. Once the signal reaches the muscle, the terminal motor neurons fire and by doing so they stimulate muscle fibres, causing them to contract. We use them also in conjunction with your workout to further facilitate strength and endurance benefits.

 Injury Hip Clinic- Stuart writes for Men's Running to answer the question


January 19, 2018

HELP!

“After about 30-40 minutes of steady running, the muscle that connects to the hip bone on the side of my right thigh begins to hurt. After stopping, it’s generally OK but the following day, there’s a constant dull ache. I’ve rested for a few days but the problem is still there? It’s really frustrating as it’s preventing me from running and I don’t know why it’s hurting. Any suggestions??  What it is and The Fix-  follow the link Mens Running and Hip injuries 

Athlete Suffering from Severe cramp- Daily Mail asks Stuart Mailer 

January 26th 2018

An athlete captured bizarre footage of his calf muscle moving by itself – The involuntary contraction was caused by a severe cramp, which occurred after the man participated in an intense Muay Thai training session Stuart explains why!

 Balance and Proprioception a quick guide! 


February 03 2018
Balance or the ability to maintain an upright posture can be classified more specifically as postural stability which is the ability to maintain our centre of gravity within our base of support. Furthermore, it can be classified as static stability that can be when standing still or Dynamic stability that occurs if one is moving. With dynamic movement the dynamic joint stability is controlled by dynamic restraints such as muscles and passive restraints that are noncontractile tissues such as the joint capsule, ligaments. To be able to control joint stability the dynamic restraints work in a feedforward and feedback manner which is due to proprioceptive input to the CNS causing neuromuscular control. When we get injured the ligament receptors aren't able to provide the same amount of input to the CNS as before thus our balance is affected. If we cant balance and stabilize well the other structures are then put under more lad that can then cause further injuries. Simple Single leg balance work and unstable balance exercise can help improve the CNS input and reduce the load on other structures preventing and minimizing injury risk.

Run Yourself Fit Simple Steps to a Healthier you. Great little book! 

February 06 2018
Run Yourself Fit is a book that was written by Christina Macdonald and Stuart was asked to contribute to with some chapters. Check the reviews. 
  • Find out how regular running can prevent and reduce the risk of many illnesses?
  • Start running but want advice on how to start slowly and gradually, and discover the right pace for you?
  • Know how to use running for weight loss and how to build mileage?
  • Improve your running technique to help reduce the risk of injury

 Work your Peroneal muscles and stabilize your ankle! 

March 8th 2018
The Gait guys show a simple technique of ankle control in this quick video when on your toes- come for a foot assessment and let's give you increased control and stability
  • Find out how to stabilize your ankle when running.
  • Prevent and reduce the risk of ankle sprains
  • Improve your ankle control and landing mechanics